National Consumer Protection Week 2012 Kicks Off Sunday, March 4

National Consumer Protection Week
The Federal Trade Commission and more than 30 other federal agencies, consumer groups and national advocacy organizations, in conjunction with state, county, and local government agencies, are participating in National Consumer Protection Week, March 4-10, 2012. National Consumer Protection Week is a coordinated campaign to focus attention on the importance of consumer information and provide people with free resources explaining their rights in the marketplace.

David Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, noted the campaign’s website, NCPW.gov, available in English and Spanish, hosts a variety of resources on topics that matter to the nation’s consumers.

“The information on NCPW.gov can help consumers understand their rights, protect their privacy online and off, manage credit and debt, avoid identity theft, recognize foreclosure rescue scams, and report fraud,” Vladeck said. “Visitors can download and print materials to share with friends and neighbors, or use the toolkit to plan a larger community event.”

To get materials and view a list of agencies participating in the 14th annual celebration of consumer protection and consumer education, visit the NCPW About Us page.

From FTC post 3/2/12

NCPW Toolkit

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About Bruce Demarest

Bruce Demarest is a Identity Theft Protection Specialist. He has designed and taught classes to educate individuals and businesses in identity theft risk management. The individuals have learned how to continuously monitor their financial identities from credit fraud, plus how to monitor their personal identifying information for unauthorized use. His business clients have become compliant with the federal & state privacy laws. He has conducted information security audits to identify their potential problems and has designed security policies, programs, and practices to address those problem areas.
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