Scamming the Unemployed


There are two broad areas of scams – Job-Hunting and Fake Jobs

Job-Hunting Scams

“Show me the money and I guarantee you a job.” Run don’t walk away from anyone who promises to get you a job. Don’t send them a dime up front. Their guarantee of a refund will never arrive. Usually job search services are free to the job searcher and paid by the company hiring. Plus, information about job openings with the U.S. government or U.S. Postal Service is free and available to everyone.

Read the contract of any firm who you are going to use to help find you a job. Pay attention to who is responsible for doing what.

If they won’t answer all your questions before you sign, how helpful will they be after you sign?

Check the web-site and hiring department of the actual company allegedly hiring. Don’t take the word of the recruiting firm. You need to know everything you can find about the position and company. How else can you tailor your resume and cover letter to fit what they need?

Google any recruiting firm and check with the Better Business Bureau to uncover complaints.

FTC Stops Nationwide Federal Jobs Scam

Federal and Postal Job Scams: Tip-offs to Rip-offs

Job Scams

How do the scammers make money? From you! They may get you to send them a check, give them a credit card, sign up for direct deposit or give the your SSN.

Be very careful of job listings on Craig’s List. Look for misspellings and grammatical mistakes in the job advertisement.

Monster.com lists descriptive words in job postings that are tip-offs to fraud. Their list includes “package-forwarding,” “money transfers,” “wiring funds,” “eBay,” and “PayPal.”

Work From Home: While a few work from home jobs are legit, most are scams. You need to buy product, literature or equipment up front. Then the promised riches never materialize.

You have to act now: They need you to commit now, so you don’t have time to think about their bogus job offer. They are only going to have one person in your city or state and there are other people who want the job, but you are the best person so far. Yah right don’t fall for it.

Advanced Fee: You are asked to pay for background check, training materials or travel expenses to interview. “Give us your money and we will make the arrangements for you.” “We need your credit card number for the hotel room. You will not be charged.”

Private Information: We will pay you with direct deposit, so we need your bank account information. The same numbers to put money in your account can take money out of your account. We need your Social Security Number for the government forms, to run a credit check or background check. With your SSN Identity Thieves can open credit cards in your name and leave you holding the debt. Scan your drivers’ license to verify identity. A fake on-line job application asks you for SSN, birth date and mother’s maiden name. Then they sell your information.

Postal forwarding or Reshipping fraud: Have you been asked to receive packages at your home or business and mail them to someone else? Postal inspectors advice: Don’t do it!

Privacy Rights Clearinghouse: Avoiding Online Job Scams

FTC Steps Up Efforts Against Scams That Target Financially-Strapped Consumers

Wikipedia Employment Scams

US Postal Service: Find out how to fight fraud

Be careful the scammers want your money.

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About Bruce Demarest

Bruce Demarest is a Identity Theft Protection Specialist. He has designed and taught classes to educate individuals and businesses in identity theft risk management. The individuals have learned how to continuously monitor their financial identities from credit fraud, plus how to monitor their personal identifying information for unauthorized use. His business clients have become compliant with the federal & state privacy laws. He has conducted information security audits to identify their potential problems and has designed security policies, programs, and practices to address those problem areas.
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